Thank you for taking the time to consider partnering with MAF in transforming lives through your legacy.

We understand how difficult it can be to find the right organisation to leave a legacy to. There are many factors to weigh up in a decision like this and we know you have several questions in coming to this webpage. We hope to help answer some of them here.

Why leave a legacy to MAF

Why leave a legacy to MAF

  • The MAF ministry has been in place for almost 70 years. We are a deeply-rooted and well-established organisation, meaning your legacy is in safe and reputable hands.
  • Of top priority to us here at MAF is the careful and prudent use of funds. We only allocate money to areas and programmes where we can achieve the most impact, meaning your legacy is in efficient hands.
  • It is estimated that the ministry of MAF delivers transformational support to over 1 million of the world’s poorest and most isolated people each year. This means that your legacy is in effective hands.
  • Although we serve everyone regardless of race, creed or religion, we are motivated and driven by Jesus Christ and His love for humanity, meaning your legacy is in Christian hands.
  • MAF facilitates the work of over 2000 organisations worldwide. Groups like World Vision, Compassion, Save the Children, Oxfam and many others depend on MAF to achieve their mission, meaning your legacy enables the synergistic work of many hands.

Helpful resources

Helpful resources

We have produced a number of key resources to help you further weigh up the possibility of taking this step:

  • The new and enjoyable seven minute DVD Lifeline beyond your lifetime shows why bequests are such a vital way of supporting MAF’s aviation ministry. It comes in its own collectible package. You can also watch it here.
  • “Your guide to including MAF Australia in your will” is a no-nonsense information booklet that outlines all you need to know in order to make a bequest to MAF. Download it as a pdf here.
  • Using helpful categories, “Keeping your memories alive” enables you to summarise and record in one place details of your personal affairs in a 36 page booklet. It can also help you decide how your estate should be allocated.

Any or all of these resources are available free of charge by contacting us on Freecall 1800 650 169, or by email to [email protected]

Suggested bequest wording

Suggested bequest wording

“I,…………………………give, devise and bequeath to MAF Australia (ABN 26 134 583 887) for its general purposes, free of all duties, the following: (whichever is applicable)

The sum of $…………….    

…………..% of my estate

The residue, or………………% of the residue of my estate

Life insurance policy number…………………………………    

Property situated at……………………………………………    

Other (details)………………………………………………….    
and I direct that the receipt of the Chief Executive Officer, or other proper officer of MAF Australia shall be sufficient discharge to my executor for the bequest.”
The precise wording that you use in your Will should be finalised with the help of a solicitor to ensure that your exact wishes are conveyed.

(That wording can be downloaded here)

Harry Hartwig Fellowship

Harry Hartwig Fellowship

(named in honour of MAF’s first pilot in Papua New Guinea)

This is a very exclusive grouping of very special people who have included MAF in their will. We invite our bequestors to become members of the Harry Hartwig Fellowship.

Please let us know if you have decided to leave a gift in your estate for the future use of MAF. Special events are organised from time to time, to which Fellowship members are invited. If you are already a MAF bequestor, and have not yet received an invitation to membership, please let us know.

More information on the Harry Hartwig Fellowship can be found here.

Some Help with making a will

Some Help with making a will

Making a will is the only way you can be sure your wishes will be followed after you die. It also means less confusion and heartache for your loved ones in their time of grief. It also offers the perfect opportunity to reflect on what’s been important in your life, or what you’d like to see supported in the future.

If you don’t make a will, part or all of your estate may end up going to people you never intended to benefit because the law will dictate how your estate is distributed.

If you have no next of kin and no will, your estate will pass to the State/Crown. And if you do have relatives, they may disagree about what should happen with your estate. Your will clearly explains your intentions and ensures they are carried out.

The people who handle your affairs after you’re gone are called executors. They can be professionals, friends, family members or any combination of these. It’s usual for two people to share the task of executing your will.

Gifts can be anything you own including specific items, money, property or a percentage of your estate.

So before making a will you need to make some important decisions about what you

Who will look after your children?

If you have children under the age of 18 you’ll need to decide who you would like to take care of them if you die before they reach the age of consent.

Including your loved ones

Of course your loved ones come first. So you will need to include your children and perhaps nieces, nephews and close friends. You can also provide for your pets.

Including Mission Aviation Fellowship

If you’re lucky enough to be able to look back and say you’ve had a good life, wouldn’t it be nice to know there’s a way to help those who haven’t been so fortunate. Through giving to MAF you make it possible to bring the life-transforming Gospel of Jesus Christ, as well as life-sustaining services, to some of the poorest and most remote, isolated people on earth.

How would you like your assets distributed?

You’ll need to think about who is to receive what and how.

Different types of bequests

There are four main types of gifts you can leave in your will, including those you may leave to charity.

  1. Residual:

This is the remainder of your estate after first leaving gifts to your loved ones.

  1. Percentage or fractional:

This is a gift expressed as a percentage or fraction of your estate. Dividing your estate by percentage or fractions gives longevity to your will because the gifts aren’t influenced by inflation or changes in the value or make-up of your estate.

  1. Pecuniary or Specific:

This is a specified gift which can be money, property or stocks and shares.

  1. Whole estate:

This comprises your entire estate and is usually left by those without family or other preferred beneficiaries, or those wanting to achieve something very significant with their gift.

If you have a very complex estate and wish it distributed in a complex manner you will need to seek professional advice.

What funeral arrangements you would like?

Your will also offers the opportunity to say what you’d like to happen at your funeral. This can greatly help your loved ones in their time of grief.

Talk with someone about this decision